Why does the Sun appear reddish orange during sunset and sunrise?

Why does the Sun appear reddish orange during sunset and sunrise?

a     Light of shorter wavelengths, such as violet, blue, green and yellow undergoes greater scattering than those of longer wavelengths, such as orange and red.
b     Light of longer wavelengths, such as violet, blue, green and yellow undergoes greater scattering than those of higher wavelengths, such as orange and red.
c      All the colours are scattered away except red.
d     Due to earth’s thick atmosphere.
Explanation:

Solution (a)

The light from the Sun travels through Earth’s atmosphere it undergoes scattering before it reaches us. The extent of scattering is not uniform for all colours. Light of shorter wavelengths, such as violet, blue, green and yellow undergoes greater scattering than those of longer wavelengths, such as orange and red. Because of the spherical geometry of the earth, the sunlight travels longer distance in the thick of the earth’s atmosphere during sunset and sunrise when the Sun is at the horizons than when the Sun is at the zenith (midday). Thus, there is more probability for shorter wavelength light to get more scattered than for the longer wavelength light. Hence, the Sun (and sunrise and sunset) appears reddish orange during sunset and sunrise.

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