Pulikkali festival – Kerala

Pulikkali festival

  • Pulikkali is a colorful recreational folk art from the state of Kerala.
  • It is performed by trained artists to entertain people on the occasion of Onam, an annual harvest festival, celebrated mainly in Kerala.
  • On the fourth day of Onam celebrations (Nalaam Onam), performers painted like tigers and hunters in bright yellow, red, and black dance to the beats of instruments like Udukku and Thakil.
  • Literal meaning of Pulikkali is the ‘play of the tigers’ hence the performance revolve around the theme of tiger hunting.
  • The folk art is mainly practiced in Thrissur district of Kerala.
  • The origin of Pulikkali dates back to over 200 years, when the Maharaja Rama Varma Sakthan Thampuran, the then Maharaja of Cochin, is said to have introduced the folk art, who wanted to celebrate Onam with a dance that reflected the wild and macho spirit of the force.
Advertisements

Navroz festival : Parsi People

  • It is a Parsi New Year festival.
  • While the Balkans, the Caucasus, the Middle Easterns celebrate the festival on March 21, the first day of the Zoroastrian calendar, in India there is another version of the festival that is followed according to the Shahanshahi calendar and falls during the later months of the year.
  • The dates change every year since the calendar doesn’t account for leap years.
  •  Also known as Pateti, Navroz will be celebrated on August 17th this year in India.
  • The festivities on this day symbolize happiness, harmony and amity for the Parsi community.
  • The time of the festival is decided in Iran and then it is passed on to the entire Zoroastrian population in the world.

UNESCO : Yoga in the representative list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

Yoga, India’s one of the ancient practices has now been inscribed as an element in the UNESCO’s list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of humanity.

  • Yoga has become the 13th intangible cultural heritage that has been listed from India so far with UNESCO.
  • Previous ones includes the Chhau dance (Inscribed in 2010), the Buddhist chanting of Ladakh, Sankirtana –the ritual singing, drumming, and dancing of Manipur, the traditional brass and copper craft of utensil making among the Thatheras of Jandiala Guru, Punjab and Ramlila- the traditional performance of the Ramayana.
  • The list of intangible cultural treasures was created 10 years ago, mainly to increase awareness about them, while UNESCO also sometimes offers financial or technical support to countries struggling to protect them.

Muziris project

  • Muziris is the largest heritage conservation project in India and is a Kerala government’s initiative involving renovation of ancient places of worship, old markets, forts and the construction of museums.
  • The ancient world’s greatest trading centre in the East, this legendary seaport traded in everything from spices to precious stones with the Greeks, Romans and the rest of the world.
  • The Muziris Heritage Project will revive that lost legacy to conserve and showcase a culture of 3000 years or more for posterity.
  • Once the doorway to India for varied cultures and races including Buddhists, Arabs, Chinese, Jews, Romans, Portuguese, Dutch and even the British, Muziris has stood witness to civilisations being born, wars being waged and history being written.